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Together

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Together

Let’s take it all
The burden of years under the cloak of night
Let’s take them all
And throw them into the fire
Then we’ll walk into the light

Let’s gather the storms
Let’s gather the stones
The sticks and thorns
All the things they said
Would break our bones

We’ll throw them away
Then have a party, celebrate
The end of days
That we’ll never live again

Together
We will leave behind
All that things that burdened
Our minds
The past will no longer matter
Cause together we’ll see it’s end
The end of broken dreams
And low self-esteem
And discover a long forgotten friend
The was buried deep in you and me

©2018 C.A. Barnes

Relentless

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Relentless

If all it took was one more day
Would it give you the strength
To try again
If all that was needed
Was a minute more
Would you stand in the bitter rain
Deal with the wind and stinging pain
Wait for that open door

Why can’t you believe like this
Why can’t you see things like that
Why can’t you be just a little fearless
Why can’t you live relentless

If all it took was another night
Would you fight
To change your life
If all that was asked
Was to be brave
You can’t lose now
Someone has paved the way
For you, the only thing left to do
Is to choose if you want to win or lose

Why can’t you believe like this
Why can’t you see things like that
Why can’t you be just a little fearless
Why can’t you live relentless

Why can’t we see
That we were created
Created, created, created
To be, to do anything
If we believe this
We can be relentless

©2018 C.A. Barnes

No More

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No More

I let them go
No more
I don’t know
No more
Maybe far away
They’re out there
Calling my name
Begging for some answer
Why they couldn’t stay
No more

I let them go
No more
And yes I do know
The time had finally come
To take the past
And let it be done
There is something out there
For me
So I had to let them go
So I could see
Who I truly am
When I’m stripped of everything

No more
They had to go
No more
No more
No more

©2018 C.A. Barnes

Book Review: To Wager Her Heart By Tamera Alexander

Blurb:

Sylas Rutledge, the new owner of the Northeast Line Railroad, invests everything he has into this venture, partly for the sake of the challenge. But mostly to clear his father’s name. One man holds the key to Sy’s success–General William Giles Harding of Nashville’s Belle Meade Plantation. But Harding is champagne and thoroughbreds, and Sy Rutledge is beer and bullocks.

Seeking justice . . . 

Sy needs someone to help him maneuver his way through Nashville’s society, and when he meets Alexandra Jamison, he quickly decides he’s found his tutor. Only, he soon discovers that the very train accident his father is blamed for causing is what killed Alexandra Jamison’s fiancé–and has shattered her world.

Struggling to restore honor . . . 

Spurning an arranged marriage by her father, Alexandra instead pursues her passion for teaching at Fisk University, the first freedmen’s university in the United States. But family–and Nashville society–do not approve, and she soon finds herself cast out from both.

Through connections with the Harding family, Alexandra and Sy become unlikely allies. And despite her first impressions, Alexandra gradually finds herself coming to respect, and even care for this man. But how can she, when her heart is still spoken for? And when Sy’s roguish qualities and adventuresome spirit smack more of recklessness than responsibility and honor?

Sylas Rutledge will risk everything to win over the woman he loves. What he doesn’t count on is having to wager her heart to do it.

General Thoughts:

I’ve read so many books from this author and she’s never failed to tell a story that is genuine, moving, and makes the reader (I, at least) feel instantly connected to the characters. This story really spoke to me mainly because of the challenges that the main character, Alexandra, went through. She struggled to pursue a vocation that was important to her, despite the lack of support her social circle and family had for it: teaching at a Freedmen’s school. She essentially lost everything, her family especially, by accepting a position at Fisk University.

Not only was she dealing with that challenge and the sort of isolation it created for her, but she was still trying to overcome the loss of her fiancé due to a tragic train accident that happened the year before, which she luckily survived. But it was the introduction of Sylas, who helped alleviate her challenges and slowly turned things around for her.

Sylas was sort of an antagonist to Alexandra at first, in that, she blamed him for the death of her fiancé, since it was his father who drove the train which later crashed, killing nearly everyone, including the father. Sylas had his own struggle in accepting that his father would deliberately crash the train, so he set out to investigate the truth on his own—what really happened. Through this, he wanted to clear his father’s name, but deep down, he wanted Alexandra to see him in a better light and hopefully win her heart, since the more time he spent with her, the more he realized he loved her.

In all, I enjoyed how Sylas and Alexandra’s relationship grew more and more meaningful. I especially enjoyed seeing the transformation in Alexandra’s heart and mind. Sylas helped her overcome her fear of trains and Alexandra learned to accept things as they are and understand people for who they are. Though, as in reality, everything didn’t end the way Alexandra and Sylas would have hoped, the author, as always, was able to weave a meaningful message in the story, which left me, once again, smiling and believing a little more about the dream I wish to pursue.

Recommendation:

Yes, I would recommend this story, not only to those who like historical fiction, but those who are looking for stories that will make them think and consider how they want to live life. In short, stories that have to power to change.

Rating:

5 out of 5 stars. I couldn’t find a real flaw to the story. The plot moved at an even paced and the characters, especially Alexandra and Sylas, were endearing. There were hints of suspense in the story that made me anxious to get to the end, which was unpredictable.

Book Review: Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine By Gail Honeyman

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Blurb:

No one’s ever told Eleanor that life should be better than fine. 
Meet Eleanor Oliphant: She struggles with appropriate social skills and tends to say exactly what she’s thinking. Nothing is missing in her carefully timetabled life of avoiding social interactions, where weekends are punctuated by frozen pizza, vodka, and phone chats with Mummy.

But everything changes when Eleanor meets Raymond, the bumbling and deeply unhygienic IT guy from her office. When she and Raymond together save Sammy, an elderly gentleman who has fallen on the sidewalk, the three become the kinds of friends who rescue one another from the lives of isolation they have each been living. And it is Raymond’s big heart that will ultimately help Eleanor find the way to repair her own profoundly damaged one.

Smart, warm, uplifting, Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine is the story of an out-of-the-ordinary heroine whose deadpan weirdness and unconscious wit make for an irresistible journey as she realizes. . .

The only way to survive is to open your heart. 

General Thoughts:

I want to start by saying that I loved this story. Read the very first page, the first two paragraphs, and you’ll have everything you need to completely know who the main character, Eleanor is, and the tone of the story. I was instantly captured when I read the first page.

Written in first person, I was given a front row seat to Eleanor’s unfiltered mind, which was too honest to be mad at. I felt the things she thought about people, and basically modern day life, was what many people probably think. Many times her bluntness, her unfiltered mind, would escape her mouth and I found it most humorous when that happened. The author did a great job illustrating people’s reactions and responses to Eleanor’s innocent honesty—I could tell that the author was an avid observer of life, which as a writer is valuable if you want to write an authentic story.

Despite Eleanor’s insensitivity by being too honest, I found her to be likeable and sympathetic, maybe empathetic at times. I think with all the issues Eleanor struggled with, there was something within her issues that many can relate to, everyone—I would dare say, at some point in life. Her struggle with loneliness, self-esteem, relating to people or finding like-minded friends, made me feel her pain. There were several parts in the story, where the author powerfully described the many feelings she faced, using examples, stories, comparisons, and observations. It was very difficult to not feel the way Eleanor was feeling, even if I wasn’t experiencing what she was at the time.

But the shining light of the story is seeing Eleanor’s transformation. As she transformed, I felt challenged to transform as well. Another thing I have to give kudos to the author was the big I didn’t see it coming surprise at the end of the story. I will say, this story had some bits of mystery, especially surrounding her mother and past, but what was revealed at the end, I don’t think anyone could have known. And that’s what I call a good story.

Recommendation:

Yes, I would recommend this story to everyone. I think there was so much going on that it will appeal to many and maybe even surprise those who tend to lean towards genre fiction. The story kept moving, the blunt humor was constantly there, and there was an air of mystery to Eleanor’s life that I believe would stir one’s curiosity to see how things end.

Rating:

4.5 out of 5 stars. Really, why not make it five stars since I probably only said positive things about it? This is my personal preference, but this story did contain some offensive language, although I will not say it was excessive, and I think the story would have still been as powerful without it.

He’s Lost

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He’s Lost

He’s lost, he’s lost
He doesn’t know the seeds he sows
He thinks he’s fine, he thinks he’s right
But he doesn’t know
He lives in the night

Oh what’s it going to take
Oh what’s got to be lost
Oh what’s got to go
Before he can flee
Before he can grow

He’s lost, he’s so lost
A victim of his world, which into he has bought
He knows not what he do
He thinks in the end, he’ll win
But he’s setting himself up to lose

Oh if I could reach him now
Oh if I could do it somehow
Make him want to hear
Make him want to see
The reality, waiting to be
If he doesn’t flee
If he doesn’t flee
Oh if he doesn’t flee
He’ll never be free

©2017 C.A. Barnes

Book Review: Holding The Fort By Regina Jennings

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Blurb:

With Miss Bell as the Teacher, Everyone’s Bound to Learn an Interesting Lesson

Dance hall singer Louisa Bell has always lived one step from destitution. When she loses her job at the Cat-Eye Saloon, she has nowhere else to go but to her brother, a cavalry soldier stationed in Indian Territory. But he’s run afoul of his commanding officer. Unsure what she can do to help him and desperate for a job, she doesn’t protest when she’s mistaken for a governess at the fort. How hard can teaching really be?

Major Daniel Adams has his hands full at Fort Reno, especially raising two adolescent daughters alone. If this new governess doesn’t work out, his mother-in-law insists she’ll raise the girls herself–far away from the fort. Miss Bell bears little resemblance to Daniel’s notion of a governess–they’re not supposed to be so blamed pretty–but he finds himself turning a blind eye to her unconventional methods. Louisa has never faced so important a performance. Can she keep her act together long enough to help her brother and to secure the respectable future she’s sought for so long?

General Thoughts: 

This story was what I would call a lighthearted read. Taking place in western Indian Territory in the late 1800s, I felt that the author effectively developed an environment that gave me a sense of what it would have been like to live in such a world during that time. However, the bulk of the story wasn’t focus primarily on the environment or history—which is fine, as it was on the main character, Louisa Bell. I struggled to connect with Louisa, although I wouldn’t say she was an unlikeable character. The part that I struggled with was Louisa’s lack of confidence in explaining or expressing herself, especially to the Adams, the family she was a governess to. I felt she was somewhat flakey. Of course, I believe that was the author’s intent in creating such a character, so I would say the author did a great job in doing so.

The story progressed steadily and there weren’t any parts that significantly lingered or dragged on, however, there just wasn’t enough excitement in the story. There was little to no mystery or intrigue, as well as action, which I tend to like in stories. I felt sure of how things would end for Louisa. I was even sure of the chain of events leading to the end. Again, I think what made me keep reading, even though I felt the story was predictable, was that each chapter offered some progressed. With each chapter things moved forward, got somewhere.

Another negative, as a mentioned earlier about Louisa, was the collective personalities of Louisa and Daniel Adams. In general, they both struggled to accept the truth or face the truth, so they did a lot of skirting around the issue or covering things up, which was exhausting. I know those are the personalities that the author intended to create, but given that the story was lighthearted and there wasn’t a lot was going on in terms of mystery, intrigue, and action, my interest wasn’t always captured.

Recommendation:

Yes, I would still recommend this story, especially to those who are more interested in drama and like lighthearted reads that focus on characters and their internal struggles.

Rating:

3 out of 5 stars. I think the story was well written and sounded authentic for the time and place. However, there was not a lot going on and the characters struggled to express themselves or face the issues. Given there was not much else happening in terms of action, mystery, and intrigue, it didn’t make for an exciting read.

***This book was given to me by Bethany House for an honest review.***

The Greatest Gift

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The Greatest Gift

One can’t bring anyone
Anything greater than this
There’s nothing in the world
That can surpass this gift
Beyond all the goodies
And the bliss this season gives
Nothing compares to…

The greatest gift
It’s more than one could wish
Oh the greatest gift
Greater than anything big or small
Is the son, who died for us all

One can’t compare the joy
This season is with this
There’s nothing in this world
That can surpass this gift
Above all the stars in the sky
Or magical reindeer that fly
Nothing compares to…

The greatest gift
It’s more than one could wish
Oh the greatest gift
Greater than anything big or small
Is the son, who died for us all

So this holiday season
Let’s count all the reasons
Why we will celebrate
Above all the presents
Beyond all the treats
I have one wish
That all may never forget
The greatest gift

The greatest gift
It’s more than one could wish
Oh the greatest gift
Greater than anything big or small
Is the son, who died for us all

© 2005 C.A. Barnes

I originally posted this lyrical poem in 2014, but I think its so appropriate for the Christmas holiday, that I had to share it again. I wish everyone a wonderful Christmas and Holiday!!!

Christmastime

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Christmastime

There’ll be trimming of the tree
And so many sights to see
Little ones wishing it’d always be
Christmastime

There’ll be baking goodies galore
And many cookies and cakes for sure
Eating until there’s no room for more
At Christmastime

There’ll be rooms filled with delight
And children who can’t wait till its night
Hoping to see Santa and reindeer in flight
At Christmastime

There’ll be telling of old Christmas tales
And drinking of eggnog and ginger ale
Looking through windows frosted and pale
At Christmastime

There’ll be celebrations of the savior’s day
Giving meaning to this special holiday
Meeting old and new friends along the way
At Christmastime

Christmastime
May the joy this season brings
Always shine

© 2005 C.A. Barnes

Since Christmas is soon approaching, I thought it would be appropriate to share two Christmas songs (next week’s one is my favorite) that I wrote in my earlier years as a writer. Originally this poem was for a contest, which I’m not sure I ever entered it in 🙂

I Stopped

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I Stopped

I stopped looking
I stopped searching
I stopped wandering
I stopped

I stopping fighting
I stopping trying
I stopped tiring
I stopped

I took a moment to breathe
A moment to be
To escape
To getaway
I spent some time alone with myself
I stopped asking others for help
Because they couldn’t save
Me

I stopped looking
I stopped searching
I stopped wandering
I stopped

I stopped fighting
I stopped trying
I stopped tiring
I stopped

I took some time just to think
Of where I wanted to go
Of what I wanted to know
Most importantly,
How I wanted to grow
And I eventually set myself
Free

I stopped wandering
I stopped tiring
I stopped.

© 2017 C. A. Barnes